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Old 01-27-2008, 11:16 AM
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Winter rest-orchids

What sorts of orchids require dry winter rest? i know that D nobile, cymbidiums, coelogyne want a cool period. Is there any other sort of 'chid who have dormant period? I have excellent conditions for them so I'd like to grow those beauties...
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Old 01-27-2008, 11:26 AM
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Alot of terrestrial orchids have winter rests. I highly recommend Disa orchids if you have good rainwater or RO water available.

There other Dens as well which like a cool winter but wont shed their leaves. They are quite happy down to lower temps, maybe 8-10 celsius as long as they're kept dry with good air movement.

Becareful grouping all Coelogyne as cool growers with rests. Most I believe are actually intermediates and warm growers, though its mainly the cooler species that are most common. White flowered Coel tend to be cooler, while greens and browns usually mean warmer, but of course its always best to check.
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Old 01-27-2008, 01:26 PM
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There are around a 1000 Dendrobium species, and probably half of them need special seasonal changes. There is a book, now out of print that has cultural info on about 99% of them. It is 'Orchid Species Culture: Dendrobiums' by Baker and Baker. I bought mine for around $70, but the price appears to have been going up recently, as the surplus new books floating around has been drying up. But if you are patient, you might find the book at a reasonable price used. But, if you are only going to be growing a few of these, you may be able to get the same info for about a $1 a plant from:
Orchid Culture - Charles and Margaret Baker
Check out their free culture sheets, and you will see how very detailed the info is. Nothing like it anywhere else. You can also find info on other orchids than Dens. Many need no special treatment, so a culture sheet is not really necessary. Note also, that there is an equivalent book from them on the Oncidium family currently in print for a reasonable amount of money. I think most Oncidiums don't require special treatment, so this may not be a very valuable book to you, but is very useful to people growing out of doors, as info on temperature hardiness is given.
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Old 01-27-2008, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia, Prescott, AZ View Post
There are around a 1000 Dendrobium species, and probably half of them need special seasonal changes. There is a book, now out of print that has cultural info on about 99% of them. It is 'Orchid Species Culture: Dendrobiums' by Baker and Baker. I bought mine for around $70, but the price appears to have been going up recently, as the surplus new books floating around has been drying up. But if you are patient, you might find the book at a reasonable price used. But, if you are only going to be growing a few of these, you may be able to get the same info for about a $1 a plant from:
Orchid Culture - Charles and Margaret Baker
Check out their free culture sheets, and you will see how very detailed the info is. Nothing like it anywhere else. You can also find info on other orchids than Dens. Many need no special treatment, so a culture sheet is not really necessary. Note also, that there is an equivalent book from them on the Oncidium family currently in print for a reasonable amount of money. I think most Oncidiums don't require special treatment, so this may not be a very valuable book to you, but is very useful to people growing out of doors, as info on temperature hardiness is given.
Thank you Cynthia! At my place, temps never fall below 0 Celsius, which is good. Hmm.. I thought that phalaenopsis type dends should be in warm place during all year? I didn't know that they also want cool, winter rest... Thanks tom!
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Old 01-27-2008, 06:33 PM
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tom499,

This is off topic, but i just wanted to say you've really come a long way from when you first joined the forum. Since then it appears you've really learned a lot. You've given a first rate reply.

Good on you! Keep up the great work!
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Old 01-28-2008, 01:53 PM
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Aleksa, where did you find info that Phal type Dendrobiums need a 'cool' rest? Many plants need a rest that does not involve any notable drop in temperature, perhaps maybe only the difference we experience in our homes between summer and winter. And many need only a modest change in moisture, with many Dens needing, as do the Phal types, a true wet/dry cycle while not growing, but watering before actually drying out while in growth or bloom. I think I will post an article I wrote for our local orchid societies on watering Dendrobiums.
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia, Prescott, AZ View Post
Aleksa, where did you find info that Phal type Dendrobiums need a 'cool' rest? Many plants need a rest that does not involve any notable drop in temperature, perhaps maybe only the difference we experience in our homes between summer and winter. And many need only a modest change in moisture, with many Dens needing, as do the Phal types, a true wet/dry cycle while not growing, but watering before actually drying out while in growth or bloom. I think I will post an article I wrote for our local orchid societies on watering Dendrobiums.
Well, tom said that they are happy on cool temps 8 to 10 Celsius... That is considered cool here... I always forget that Phal type Dends live in warm and tropical area...
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:32 PM
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I believe Tom was writing about other Dendrobium species, not necessarily Den. phalaenopsis or its hybrids. Perhaps something like Den. kingianum? I admit, I am not very knowledgeable about dens.

jeanne
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:55 PM
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When I say Den phalaenopsis I mean hard cane dends (also don't know whether that is correct). Dendrobiums are indeed so numerous and difficult to understand!
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Old 03-19-2008, 08:17 AM
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Aleska, I klnow it has been a long time since your last post but I have some info that will be helpful regarding "hard cane" dendrobiums.

I dont' like the term "hard cane" for dendrobiums because it is too broad and vague and doesn't tell you anythign useful about the plant. Den kingianum and hybrids as well as Den biggibum and its hybrids (the name Den phalaenopsis is no longer the recognized name for that species. It is now obsolete.) and several other dendrobes all of which require different conditions are all collectively refered to as "hard cane dens."

I prefer the grouping of dendrobiums that refers to the species groupings (like New Guinea dendrobiums, antelope dendrobiums, etc) or hybrid groups based on their species backgrounds (like nobile-type, or phal-type).

There are so many of them that it's true they're difficult to get your head around. I'm learning them only a few at a time as I try growing them.
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Old 03-19-2008, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmarch View Post
Aleska, I klnow it has been a long time since your last post but I have some info that will be helpful regarding "hard cane" dendrobiums.

I dont' like the term "hard cane" for dendrobiums because it is too broad and vague and doesn't tell you anythign useful about the plant. Den kingianum and hybrids as well as Den biggibum and its hybrids (the name Den phalaenopsis is no longer the recognized name for that species. It is now obsolete.) and several other dendrobes all of which require different conditions are all collectively refered to as "hard cane dens."

I prefer the grouping of dendrobiums that refers to the species groupings (like New Guinea dendrobiums, antelope dendrobiums, etc) or hybrid groups based on their species backgrounds (like nobile-type, or phal-type).

There are so many of them that it's true they're difficult to get your head around. I'm learning them only a few at a time as I try growing them.
Thanks Kmarch! That is very useful information!

The problem is that in my country there are no orchid nurseries. I'm getting chids from one Garden center and their names are always tagged something like: 'Orchid mix' or 'Dendrobium phalaenopsis', so there is no way I can find out their true names... I can make difference between nobile-type and phal-type, but nothing more. As you said there is so many of them...

So, I'm going to learn now new nomenclature of Dends!
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Old 03-19-2008, 10:00 AM
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Aleska,
For those with a winter dormancy, Pleione, Bletilla and Stenoglottis are worth trying. You should be able to track these down within the EU easily enough. Plenty of European terrestrial orchids will be suited to your climate. Many are amenable to cultivation but be aware that temperate terrestrial orchid culture is generally quite different to that of tropical epiphytes. There are a few European vendors specialising in terrestrial orchids: www.myorchids.de, Hardy Orchids, ground-orchids, informations and pricelist of ground orchids. If you're just after genera that won't baulk at the cold Zygopetalum, most Masdevallia and most Sarcochilus will take temperatures along the same lines you're talking about. You'll find there are also several individual species from typically warmer growing genera that take very low temperatures eg Paph insigne, Laelia anceps and gouldiana, a few Stanhopea, a few Bulbo's etc.
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