Go Back   Orchid Forum Orchid Care > Orchid Care > Orchid Care Cultivation

Like Tree8Likes
  • 5 Post By fred
  • 1 Post By jyoung03
  • 1 Post By Catt Mandu
  • 1 Post By jyoung03

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-12-2007, 06:21 AM
Site Administrator
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,128
Images: 44
Thanks: 2,133
Thanked 3,227 Times in 1,354 Posts
fred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond repute
Cattleya Culture notes

Cattleyas are some of the most commonly grown orchid plants, and their culture is often used as the basis for comparison with other types of orchids. The flowers in cattleyas and their related hybrids come in most all colors of the spectrum. Culture varies only slightly among most of these groups; this cultural information is a general guide to "standard" Cattleya culture. Like most other cultivated orchids, cattleyas are epiphytic, or air plants. Because they are epiphytic, they have developed water-storage organs, called pseudobulbs, and have large, fleshy roots covered with a spongy, water-retentive velamen. They are accustomed to being dry at the roots between waterings, and therefore should be potted in very porous, free-draining media.

Light: is one of the most important factors in growing and blooming cattleyas, whether in a greenhouse setting or in the home. Bright light to some sun must be given to the plants, but no direct sun in the middle of the day. This means an east, shaded-south (as with a sheer curtain), or west window in the home, and 30% to 50% of full sun in a greenhouse (3000 to 5000 foot-candles). Leaves should be a medium green color.

Temperatures: Recommended temperatures are 55°-60°F at night and 70°-85°F during the day. Seedlings should have night temperatures 5° to 10° higher. A 10-20 degree differential between day and night is recom- mended, especially for mature plants. Higher day temperatures can be tolerated (up to 95°), if humidity, air circulation, and shading are increased.

Water: should be provided in two ways: in the pot by watering and in the air as humidity. Watering in the pot is dictated by many criteria--size and type of pot, temperature, light, etc. Mature cattleyas need to dry out thoroughly before being watered again. Seedlings need slightly more constant moisture. Compare the weight of a dry pot of the same size and type of medium; it can indicate if a plant needs water. A freshly sharpened pencil inserted in the potting medium can be an indicator of moisture. If in doubt, it's best to wait a day or two until watering. Plants in active growth need more water than plants that are resting. Water below 50° may injure plants, as will softened water.
Cynthia,s Skewer method is a better way of testing than useing a pencil
http://www.orchidgeeks.com/forum/orc...f-orchids.html

Humidity: Cattleyas need 50 % to 80 % relative humidity. This can be provided in the home by placing the plants on trays of gravel, partially filled with water so that the plants stand above the water. Misting the plants in the morning only is helpful in dry climates. Air should always be moving around the plants to prevent fungal or bacterial diseases, especially if high humidity and/or cool temperatures exist. In the greenhouse the humidity can be increased by wetting the floor. Evaporative cooling increases humidity while cooling the air.

Fertilizer: must be given to cattleyas on a regular schedule. In fir bark, a high-nitrogen (30-10-10) formula- tion, or a similar proportion, is used. High-phosphorus or bloom-booster (10-30-20) formulation may be used occasionally (every 4 to 6 applications) to make sturdy growths and promote healthy blooming. When in active growth, plants need fertilizer every two weeks, and when not growing, once a month. Fertilizer can also be applied with every watering at 1/4 recommended dilution. Thorough flushing with clear water every month is recommended to prevent buildup of fertilizer salts.

Potting: Potting is necessary when 1) the rhizome of the plants protrudes over the edge of the pot, or 2) the potting medium starts to break down and drain poorly (usually after 2 to 3 years). It is best to repot 1) just before new roots sprout from the rhizome, 2) after flowering, or 3) in the springtime.
Cattleyas are usually potted in medium-grade potting material, with seedlings in fine-grade. Until a plant has six mature pseudobulbs, it generally should be put into a larger pot and not divided. If dividing a plant 3 to 5 bulbs per division are required. Select a pot that will allow for 2 to 3 years of growth before crowding the pot. Place a small cone of potting material in the bottom of the pot, cut off any rotten roots, and spread the firm, live roots over the cone. Fill the pot with medium, working it in the roots. Pack firmly; stake if necessary. Keep the plant humid, shaded, and dry at the roots for a while to promote new root growth. A vitamin B-l solution may help re-establish plants quickly.
Ghana O, Orquiadicto, rosa and 2 others like this.
__________________
please help keep orchidgeeks free for our members all donations welcome http://www.orchidgeeks.com/forum/vbdonator.php
Reply With Quote
The Following 33 Users Say Thank You to fred For This Useful Post:
-k- (04-30-2010), beezermommy (02-03-2012), BGGraham1 (06-21-2011), BirdWoman (07-30-2013), cabbo (03-07-2010), davetheorchidaddict (06-23-2010), debbieNZ (04-22-2013), delphiguy (05-20-2010), dillon935 (04-30-2010), dounoharm (08-08-2010), empress (04-23-2012), Epipactis12 (11-25-2011), exasperatus2002 (05-21-2010), frostychic (08-09-2009), funktified (10-17-2011), glen-watcheston (04-12-2013), grandmapenguin (12-20-2008), Julez (05-20-2010), koshki (01-25-2012), ldrhawke (12-26-2009), orchidaddict789 (05-21-2010), orchids4me (05-16-2010), Orquiadicto (09-03-2012), Raptuserum (05-25-2009), Rishad Kalarikkal (09-26-2008), rita3095 (07-26-2012), rosa (07-28-2012), slc (05-12-2013), solay (12-25-2008), vcuchick (05-20-2010), violetta (01-06-2009), Wendy (12-20-2008), zaeem (05-20-2010)
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2007, 11:35 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
newbie is on a distinguished road
ID'ing dead roots needing trimming

Hi,
I have a cattleya and a paph that aren't doing well. I read your care of cattleyas. How do I ID the dead roots needing trimming? are they the brown ones, and/or the brown ones that have shed part of the outer skin to show a wire like root?

thanks
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2007, 11:48 AM
Site Administrator
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,128
Images: 44
Thanks: 2,133
Thanked 3,227 Times in 1,354 Posts
fred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond repute
the dead roots will feel very light also brown in color and very soft and dry.
I would trim the roots with parts of the outer ( skin ) off.
When you see your plant root system just feel the roots so you will get to know the good ones as they will be firm to touch.
__________________
please help keep orchidgeeks free for our members all donations welcome http://www.orchidgeeks.com/forum/vbdonator.php
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2007, 01:30 AM
coffeecup's Avatar
Executive Senior Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,305
Images: 6
Thanks: 180
Thanked 358 Times in 203 Posts
coffeecup is on a distinguished road
So do cattleyas need to have the lower temperature change to encourage flowering like phals? If not, how does one initiate flower spikes on these?
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2007, 02:36 AM
Cynthia, Prescott, AZ's Avatar
Super Moderator Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Arizona
Posts: 2,682
Thanks: 0
Thanked 239 Times in 32 Posts
Cynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond repute
Button, some species are triggered by temperature, some to high temps, some to low, and some to day length. Hybrids can be any thing. Generally just don't worry about it, as almost all Catts bloom without any help.

For the culture notes, I know that some people recommend it, but I would definitely not repot by season, as Catts span the seasons for growth and rooting. The critical thing is to either not disturb the roots in repotting, such as repotting when all the mix just falls away when the rootball is being inspected, or always repot when the new growth is just starting its flush of new roots. This is different for each orchid. Some start rooting when the new growth is only a few inches long, and some start rooting when the new growth is fully mature and the plant has finished a resting period. In such a plant, new rooting occurs just about the time the new mature growth (which is just starting to root) starts its own new growth. Therefore, it is possible that two different species that produce a new growth at the same time, might have rooting take place 8 or 9 months apart, and it is the rooting that is the important factor in when to repot. Of course hybrids can have this same variation, but in an unpredictable pattern depending on which of the species are dominant.

On the subject of testing the moisture in a pot, I would highly recommend not using the freshly sharpend pencil, as sharpening is not really a method of sterilization. Anytime an object is poked into a pot with the attendent possibility of stabing roots, it should be sterile. So a new unhandled barbeque skewer is a better choice. There is a spectrum of things one can do to avoid the transfer of virus, and we each have to decide how far out on the gausian curve of effectiveness vs. effort we want to go and how important it is to us that any one plant be protected from acquiring virus. In my case, I could do better than I do, but I try to at least get the high probablility causes of virus in check with the obvious things.
__________________
Cynthia

Prescott Orchid Society
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Cynthia, Prescott, AZ For This Useful Post:
grandmapenguin (12-20-2008), orchids4me (07-05-2010), Orquiadicto (09-03-2012), Rishad Kalarikkal (09-26-2008), zaeem (05-20-2010)
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 09-26-2007, 08:54 AM
Aleksa's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Montenegro (South Europe)
Posts: 428
Thanks: 12
Thanked 14 Times in 10 Posts
Aleksa is on a distinguished road
Do Cattleyas require dormancy period during winter months?
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 09-26-2007, 09:16 AM
kmarch's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 12,937
Images: 1
Thanks: 4,192
Thanked 5,449 Times in 3,014 Posts
kmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond repute
Cattleyas come from Central and suth America where they don't experience much of a winter. I grow mine in the same conditions year-round.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2007, 01:51 AM
Charles's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 26
Thanks: 1
Thanked 9 Times in 2 Posts
Charles is on a distinguished road
I have also been told to let Cats rest like Den. Little water in Oct-Mar. Any truth to this?
__________________
Nuthin Fancy.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2007, 02:01 AM
kmarch's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 12,937
Images: 1
Thanks: 4,192
Thanked 5,449 Times in 3,014 Posts
kmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond repute
I've never given a Cattleya a dry rest. I've always watered consistently year round.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2007, 12:50 PM
Cynthia, Prescott, AZ's Avatar
Super Moderator Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Arizona
Posts: 2,682
Thanks: 0
Thanked 239 Times in 32 Posts
Cynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond reputeCynthia, Prescott, AZ has a reputation beyond repute
I also don't give a rest to my average Catt. One exception to this is my amethystoglossa, which is particularly sensitive to what goes on at the roots. So I make sure it is very dry before watering, and will probably be even more particular about this when it is not growing, like right now. I have heard they are high light plants, but when I took the shade cloth off the GH a couple of weeks or more ago, the several layers of plastic sheeting giving some reduction, I got a lot of red spotting on a leaf, more than I am happy with, and have move the plant from the west side of the GH to the east side. Hmm, I think I am getting off the subject. Well, maybe not. I have heard that the bifoliates like to dry quickly, and I would think that they would be particularly picky about this when not growing. I have been shifting all my bifoliates and my rupicolious Laelias to clay pots to speed drying, and boy does clay speed drying. I have to water them 2 to 3 times as often.
__________________
Cynthia

Prescott Orchid Society
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Cynthia, Prescott, AZ For This Useful Post:
orchids4me (07-05-2010)
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2007, 10:56 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tampa,Fl
Posts: 24
Images: 13
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
missmegan is on a distinguished road
My catt. is growing in a wooden basket and the roots are growing/attaching to the basket. How would I repot?
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2007, 11:32 AM
Orchidflowerchild's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Huntsville, TX
Posts: 372
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Orchidflowerchild is on a distinguished road
Megan: the point of a basket it sortof to eliminate the needt o disturb the plants through repotting. If the media starts to go to pot, you can just tease it out with your fingers or a waterhose, or something.

As for drier rests, some of the species do need a bit of a dry off. C. walkeriana, nobilior and a handfull of the other Brazillian bifoliates come from central parts of brazil, where the rains slack off for the winter months, but humidity is still high. The plants get moisture from mists and dews and the occasional rain, but in essence, they go dormant and take a rest.

Some of the upland labiate species, especially C. aurea, dowiana, rex and warsewiczii have a similarly drier winter, which also includes a concurrent increase in light, as they live among tropical hardwoods which lose some or all of their leaves in the drier season.

For both of these groups, the drying off is nowhere near as severe as, say, a Nobile Dendrobium, which are subject to very clear-cut wet/dry cycles due to monsoons and their mountainous habitats. I just make sure that those plants are completely and thoroughly dry, between waterings, and I don't water as heavily as I would during the growing season. Hybrids, especially complex ones that involve species that have no drier winter should be treated pretty much the same, all year. In short, Cattleya-alliance plants do not need a dry rest, per se, but there are a few plants that will benefit from being kept drier when not blooming or in active growth. Many people find C. dowiana very challenging and suceptible to rot, until they learn to respect the dormancy and allow the roots to completely dry off, in winter. After all, if a plant is not actively growing, it is going to need significantly less water than when it is. all that fast growth and plumping up and such is driven by water filling vacuoles of the cells and stretching them to their ultimate size. The fact that the plants retain their leaves, though, does say something about their "dormancy." Leaves do transpire and pull water up from the roots, so the plant needs enough to maintain those leaves and not get too wrinkly looking in the pseudobulbs.

Again, though, this is very specific advice for a few species that do experience a noteable seasonal shift. This information does not extrapolate to all Cattleya-type hybrids, or even all Cattleya species.

-Cj
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Orchidflowerchild For This Useful Post:
davetheorchidaddict (01-13-2009), orchids4me (07-05-2010), Rishad Kalarikkal (09-26-2008), zaeem (05-20-2010)
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2007, 01:59 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tampa,Fl
Posts: 24
Images: 13
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
missmegan is on a distinguished road
Thank orchidflowerchild
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 04-27-2008, 07:53 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Napperby SA
Posts: 1
Images: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
kevycatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by butt0n View Post
So do cattleyas need to have the lower temperature change to encourage flowering like phals? If not, how does one initiate flower spikes on these?
Dont believe all you read, phals do not need lower temp to initiate flower spikes. In fact my experiments have demonstrated that light intensity change initiates spiking in phals.
Species cats are generally seasonal flowerers and obviously spring flowerers wouldnt be initiated by a drop in temp, probably daylight length in this case. With hybrids the genes have been mixed so we now have cats that grow and flower with no regard to the season. So it really depends on the parents.
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 04-27-2008, 08:13 AM
Site Administrator
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,128
Images: 44
Thanks: 2,133
Thanked 3,227 Times in 1,354 Posts
fred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond reputefred has a reputation beyond repute
hi kevycatt
please feel free to go to our Introduction Section and introduce yourself to all of our orchidgeeks
__________________
please help keep orchidgeeks free for our members all donations welcome http://www.orchidgeeks.com/forum/vbdonator.php
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 04-27-2008, 12:56 PM
JLu JLu is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: US
Posts: 867
Thanks: 58
Thanked 818 Times in 303 Posts
JLu is on a distinguished road
Fred started this thread with a pretty good general Cattleya culture recommendation. Unfortunately it's very hard to be brief and cover the cultural requirements of a genus that ranges from Brazilian Atlantic coastal regions from slightly south of the equator to the Tropic of Capricorn, from inland Brazilian regions that undergo extremely dry seasons, the area of Manaus 1000 miles up the Amazon essentially on the equator, and the mountainous regions of Venezuela and Columbia and central America. These roughly 46 species of unifoliate and bifoliate Catts come from a diverse set of environments. Cynthia pointed out very well that Catts must be repotted when they start to root and that covers the whole year. Some root before bloom and some root after. Orchid Flowerchild (who flat knows her Catts) pointed out how differently some of the species must be viewed in terms of watering. The only generalization that works is that they should drain very well and dry between waterings. Unfortunately one must be more specific. As OFC said..dowiana and dowiana aurea will croak under watering conditions that are alright for most of the others. Walkeriana and nobilior are variable in their blooming patterns and in the site of bloom stalk initiation (sometimes from the bottom of the PB and sometimes from the top). These plants must be managed individually and closely.

Hybrids that have been selected in cultivation will usually be more tolerate to every condition than species. If you want to grow species Catts, you need to read some good Catt literature and not depend on the unreliable and diverse answers you will encounter on an internet board. I can suggest the following:

Orchid Digest Vol 68(4) Oct, Nov, Dec 2004 (available from Orchid Digest) A very detailed cultural article from William Rogerson.

American Cattleyas by Courtney T. Hackney (currently in print)

The Cattleyas and Their Relatives Vol I by Carl Withner (out of print but occasionally available used. I bought it last year for $75 but recently $150 is the going price.

The Brazilian Bifoliate Cattleyas and Their Color Varieties by J.A. Fowlie,MD. If you are really a Catt nut this is a must. It is out of print and seldom available. I got a copy for $175 last winter but you must be persistent to find one.

One other point...Someone said that Phals can be grown the same all year long and Kevycatt said quite emphatically that Phals do not need a day/night temperature differential for bloom set. At best these are controversial. First the Phals in subgenera Aphyllae and Parishianae are considerably cooler growing than other Phals since they occur in the Himalayas. Aphyllae are deciduous and obviously can't be cultured that same all year. Eric Christenson in Phalaenopsis A Monograph (generally considered a manual for species Phals) says on page 263, "The other temperature consideration is the need for a sharp difference (a swing of 10 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit) in day versus night temperatures............allows the initiation of inflorescences."

Again...when growing hybrids that were selected in cultivation, plants may be more tolerate than species to all cultivation conditions, it's highly risky to make generalizations about the culture of plants in a brief internet summary. The plants just do not cooperate with simple growth requirements. The species are isolated to certain geographical environments because they grow under different conditions than other species of the same genus.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to JLu For This Useful Post:
Izzie (10-15-2010), zaeem (05-20-2010)
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 05:58 AM
Aleksa's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Montenegro (South Europe)
Posts: 428
Thanks: 12
Thanked 14 Times in 10 Posts
Aleksa is on a distinguished road
I love catts and they are very easy to care but after I got one plant yesterday I have some questions...

I had one telephone call yesterday. One man called me to say that one Cattleya is waiting for me in another town. I went there immediately and returned with one large Catt in bag. When I got It out of the bag I saw that the plant had two old growths out of the pot wit the mass of roots outside. And on the other side of the pot there was another old growth outside of the edge. The plant was very neglected. The potting material was totally decomposed and the plant had around 11 old, mature pseudobulbs and no new growths. I know that Catts should be repoted when the new growth starts but I couldn't wait for that to occur for the mix was decayed and there was great danger of root rot.

So I decided to transplant the whole thing. When I got it out from the pot there was large mass of roots inside. Some were rotten but major part was ok. I saw mushroom (yes, mushroom) growing from the potting mix. I had to damage some live roots in order to remove every piece of old bark. I saw that rhizome was dried in the middle (where the smallest and oldest pseudobulbs were) and the plant cracked in two pieces. I got two divisons, one with 4 old pbulbs and other with 7 of them... I had big problems when putting them in new pots. Distance between growths is big and the rhizome is too long. So when I found the pot which had enough space for 2-3 new growths to grow I realised that it was too deep and too large. The plant would be overpotted in that pot. So i found some shallow and wide container, and I was nervous so I just placed the plant inside and pressed tightly the root ball, I felt the roots cracking... I added bark and pressed firmly. Grr, they are so hard to repot. And even now, there is space for only one new growth... Roots are cracked, plant has no new growts, everything sounds wrong... I think that that will set the plant back but I hope that 7 old pbulbs will do their job with storing nutritiens and water. Will this aggressive intervention set the plant back or it will encourage new growth?

How do you resolve that potting problem? I thought about putting some piece of plastic or wood on the edge of the pot so that new growth can't go outside? This sounds stupid but I'm just trying to find the way to keep the plant inside the pot... I can't find the pot that is wide enough and not too deep.

Excuse me for so long post and bad English...
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 06:12 AM
kmarch's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 12,937
Images: 1
Thanks: 4,192
Thanked 5,449 Times in 3,014 Posts
kmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond repute
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleksa View Post
I know that Catts should be repoted when the new growth starts but I couldn't wait for that to occur for the mix was decayed and there was great danger of root rot.
Many people on this forum say the best time to repot a cattleya is when the new growth starts. I politely disagree with them. I believe the best time to repot is after flowering when many catts have a short period of inactivity before new roots and growths start growing. The reasion I prefer repotting at this time is to avoid damage to new shoots and roots while repotting. Some people are careful enough and don't have any problems, but I'm not one of them. It is always wise for me to avoid handling new shoots and roots, so believe it is best to repot during a time when little if any damage can be done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleksa View Post
So i found some shallow and wide container, and I was nervous so I just placed the plant inside and pressed tightly the root ball, I felt the roots cracking... I added bark and pressed firmly. Grr, they are so hard to repot. And even now, there is space for only one new growth... Roots are cracked, plant has no new growts, everything sounds wrong... I think that that will set the plant back but I hope that 7 old pbulbs will do their job with storing nutritiens and water. Will this aggressive intervention set the plant back or it will encourage new growth?

How do you resolve that potting problem?
There is no easy solution to difficult-to-repot orchids....that's why they're difficult! In spite fo the broken roots, usually some roots get a little damaged during almost any repotting, I think you were wise tot use the shallow, wide container and even if your plant does take some time to adjust, I think you will probably be ok in the long term. Your orchid may suffer a little repotting shock but I think it will probably recover and continue to grow and flower.

Cattleyas are tough orchids.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleksa View Post
I thought about putting some piece of plastic or wood on the edge of the pot so that new growth can't go outside? This sounds stupid but I'm just trying to find the way to keep the plant inside the pot...
A piece of plastid or wood will not help. The Orchid will climb over them in the same way it climbed over the edge of the pot. There is no way to keep an orchid in a pot. It will just keep growing and growing and you will have to keep repotting (usually about eveyr 2 years) and using bigger pots.
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 06:14 AM
Aleksa's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Montenegro (South Europe)
Posts: 428
Thanks: 12
Thanked 14 Times in 10 Posts
Aleksa is on a distinguished road
And yes, one more thing. Two youngest growths have some black small spots on the leaves (It looks like someone sprinkled ink over them) . I suspect on bacterial infection. There are no spots on other leaves. I'll keep eye on that, last thing I want is spreading bacterial infection.
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 06:19 AM
Aleksa's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Montenegro (South Europe)
Posts: 428
Thanks: 12
Thanked 14 Times in 10 Posts
Aleksa is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmarch View Post


A piece of plastid or wood will not help. The Orchid will climb over them in the same way it climbed over the edge of the pot. There is no way to keep an orchid in a pot. It will just keep growing and growing and you will have to keep repotting (usually about eveyr 2 years) and using bigger pots.
Oh dear... Climbing! I will think about leaving as it is for a few years. I'll just let it grow outside... I have no space for large pots and I hate dividing orchids...

Thank you Kevin!


I bet Catts would grow well on mounts... Pity, I have no space for big mounts... But one day, when I build large greenhouse... There will be many of those nasty climbers!
Reply With Quote
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 08:10 AM
patticake's Avatar
V.I.P Member Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Halfmoon, NY
Posts: 8,173
Images: 3
Thanks: 3,167
Thanked 1,954 Times in 1,166 Posts
patticake is a glorious beacon of lightpatticake is a glorious beacon of lightpatticake is a glorious beacon of lightpatticake is a glorious beacon of lightpatticake is a glorious beacon of lightpatticake is a glorious beacon of light
Aleksa, Good luck with your new "problem" chid! I think it will do just fine in your care. While I don't like the thought of dividing orchids either, sometimes it's O.K. for aesthetic reasons. I would wait until next repot, but then remove a few of the smaller more questionable old growth. As long as there are several PB's still with the plant, it will be O.K., and look a lot better also.

__________________
Patti
Reply With Quote
  #22 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 08:16 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Clearwater, FLorida
Posts: 79
Images: 5
Thanks: 1
Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Uechi is on a distinguished road
There is no law that you have to put Cattleyas in pots. They don't grow in pots in the wild. Try mounting the Catts or put them in baskets( used for Vandas ) with maybe a little coconut fiber. Just make sure they are secure until the roots take hold. They will drain well and decrease the chance of rot. The down side is that you have to water more often. Another option is to pot the Cattleyas in plastic hydroponic pots that have lots of holes and use either nothing but expanded clay pellets or pellets plus some large fur bark pieces.
Reply With Quote
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 08:24 AM
Aleksa's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Montenegro (South Europe)
Posts: 428
Thanks: 12
Thanked 14 Times in 10 Posts
Aleksa is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uechi View Post
There is no law that you have to put Cattleyas in pots. They don't grow in pots in the wild. Try mounting the Catts or put them in baskets( used for Vandas ) with maybe a little coconut fiber. Just make sure they are secure until the roots take hold. They will drain well and decrease the chance of rot. The down side is that you have to water more often. Another option is to pot the Cattleyas in plastic hydroponic pots that have lots of holes and use either nothing but expanded clay pellets or pellets plus some large fur bark pieces.
I thought about putting them in baskets or mounting them but the space is problem... I have to keep them on my windowsill in winter and there, the space is limited... And I'm afraid of putting them in SH, they are very difficult to find here, so I'm trying not to experiment with them...

Patty, thanks for encouragement! This plant divided naturally, It grew in two opposite directions and created two separate plants!
Reply With Quote
  #24 (permalink)  
Old 09-01-2008, 07:14 PM
davetheorchidaddict's Avatar
Senior Member Photobucket
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
Posts: 679
Images: 7
Thanks: 75
Thanked 170 Times in 144 Posts
davetheorchidaddict is on a distinguished road
A long time ago an old orchid orchid grower told my wife, "Lady there are no pots in the jungle." I have used that idea for years, when I plant or replant my Catts I use wood baskets with cork chips or tree fern chunks and found they seem to like it better and display their contentment by blooming in large numbers. It does seem to take a year for them to set and start blooming for me. I also donot have problems with over watering.

Most of my Catts are watered the same year around. There are some that I give a rest period because they get it where they come from. I like to grow specie orchids and they bloom better when they are mounted.

When I get a new orchid I always repot it, some that I have bought would have dies because of rotting roots were alread developing. Some come in a pot packed with spag which is a rapid root killer.
__________________
davetheorchidaddict
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to davetheorchidaddict For This Useful Post:
crazylady8591 (07-05-2013)
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 11-27-2008, 04:09 PM
davetheorchidaddict's Avatar
Senior Member Photobucket
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
Posts: 679
Images: 7
Thanks: 75
Thanked 170 Times in 144 Posts
davetheorchidaddict is on a distinguished road
Thank orchidflowerchild
__________________
davetheorchidaddict
Reply With Quote
  #26 (permalink)  
Old 12-20-2008, 12:48 AM
Rishad Kalarikkal's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Asia,India,Kerala,Kozhikode.
Posts: 247
Images: 25
Thanks: 265
Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Rishad Kalarikkal is on a distinguished road
My catt is sending out smaller leaves than those It was having when I bought it.And it had never bloomed after that.I'm growing it in a half of a coconut shell for about two years.I had never fertilized any of my orchids.It is so much bounded to it.no way to repot it without cutting the roots it had grown by drilling the coconut husk.Now it is sending out new roots and leaves at the same time.I would personally like to repot it.but I will not be able to repot it without hurting its good strong roots.what should I do.It is very hard to find a catt in my place.I dont want to kill it just because it is not giving me blooms or it is not in a comfortable(for me) container.

Last edited by Rishad Kalarikkal; 12-20-2008 at 12:52 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #27 (permalink)  
Old 12-20-2008, 02:03 AM
kmarch's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 12,937
Images: 1
Thanks: 4,192
Thanked 5,449 Times in 3,014 Posts
kmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond repute
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rishad Kalarikkal View Post
My catt is sending out smaller leaves than those It was having when I bought it.And it had never bloomed after that.
This would probably indicate that the culture/conditions are not ideal. Take a look at the Cattleya culture sheet in this thread or at AOS | Home. Give them a good read and let us know if you have questions.

Because you do not describe the conditions you are growing it in (other than to say it's in a coconut husk) it's hard to be more specific in saying exactly what part of the culture needs improving. It's also hard to know specifically what the problem might be without knowing what kind of cattleya it is. Some must have very high light others not, some like to be kept moist, others not.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rishad Kalarikkal View Post
Now it is sending out new roots and leaves at the same time.
I don't think this is anything to worry about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rishad Kalarikkal View Post
I would personally like to repot it.but I will not be able to repot it without hurting its good strong roots.
I don't think you need to repot. Growing it in this coconut shell is like growing it mounted. Many members here grow small cattleyas mounted. I don't think this is the problem.

The problem may be light, water, temperature, etc. Give those culture sheets a read and let us know if you have questions.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kmarch For This Useful Post:
Rishad Kalarikkal (12-25-2008), zaeem (05-20-2010)
  #28 (permalink)  
Old 12-20-2008, 10:39 AM
FLBob's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: next to nothing Florida
Posts: 886
Thanks: 388
Thanked 1,024 Times in 419 Posts
FLBob is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rishad Kalarikkal View Post
My catt is sending out smaller leaves than those It was having when I bought it.And it had never bloomed after that.
You say your catt is growing but not flowering, it's time to fertilize. I fertilize my catts weekly throughout the year. I use a balanced fertilizer with minors. I use it 1/4 strength and I soak the leaves and roots. When you fertilize frequently you will also need to flush the plant regularly with clean water to remove any salts that build up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rishad Kalarikkal View Post
I'm growing it in a half of a coconut shell for about two years.
I took a look at the photos that you posted in your gallery, and from what I see you have a nice catt. I wouldn't worry about repotting if the coconut shell is not rotting and the catt roots are firmly attached.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to FLBob For This Useful Post:
Rishad Kalarikkal (12-25-2008)
  #29 (permalink)  
Old 12-20-2008, 11:44 AM
Rishad Kalarikkal's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Asia,India,Kerala,Kozhikode.
Posts: 247
Images: 25
Thanks: 265
Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Rishad Kalarikkal is on a distinguished road
Thank you so much Kmarch and FLBob..
Actually the coconut shell had really rotten.Today when I had a look at it after posting this question it just broke into two pieces. And a tiny frog jumped on to my face.Then I found a 1 inch long slug.And a family of millipedes.Two big ones and 5 small ones.and a small colony of sugar ants(thats what I call them).It was like entering into a dence forest.But there were not much roots as I have seen in over here with other geeks.Yes my coconut shell was a heaven for slugs and other creatures since it is hard to find them from it.What I used to do was to soak them weekly until every thing gets out of it.

But along with the shell some long new roots also got apart. And then I replanted it. I got two healthy plants.with 5 bulbs (potted into 8cm diameter and 10 cm height plastic pot) and 8 bulbs (potted into 8cm diameter and 4cm height clay pot) each.And one with only 4 unmatured new growths but good roots.And another one with 3 bulbs but no healthy roots and colored black right from the middle of all the 3 bulbs.I used small pieces of barks and small pieces of broken clay pot as a medium.The other two I bonted to a fern's root separately a kept them over a dry well arrangement during day time.And had decided to remove it from there at nights.

It is a fact that I have not fertilised it till now But my Den and oncedium used to give me flowers without much care other than watering(from well using horse)and shade.

What should I do with the one with only new unmatured growths?where should I keep them and how should I water it untill they get strong?Will i be able to save it? And what about those healthy ones.Both have got light green spots at the bottom of the pseudobulbs indicating new growths.But most of the new strong roots of the unmatured but still growing bulbs of about 1 and a half inches have been broken or bend.

Any advice will be of great use....thank you..
Reply With Quote
  #30 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2008, 08:47 PM
davetheorchidaddict's Avatar
Senior Member Photobucket
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
Posts: 679
Images: 7
Thanks: 75
Thanked 170 Times in 144 Posts
davetheorchidaddict is on a distinguished road
I avoid using coconut husk or chips as they are more acidic than the catts want, I use coconut fiber to cover the roots when I mount until the roots attach then I remove it and let the plant go.
__________________
davetheorchidaddict
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to davetheorchidaddict For This Useful Post:
Rishad Kalarikkal (12-25-2008)
  #31 (permalink)  
Old 12-25-2008, 12:34 AM
Rishad Kalarikkal's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Asia,India,Kerala,Kozhikode.
Posts: 247
Images: 25
Thanks: 265
Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Rishad Kalarikkal is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally posted by Davetheorchidaddict
I avoid using coconut husk or chips as they are more acidic than the catts want
Thanks davetheorchidaddict.You just told about the acidity in coconut chips.Can you please tell us about how much it is.And for what types of orchids are coconut chips useful for?

Quote:
Originally posted by Cynthia, Prescott, AZ
I have heard that the bifoliates like to dry quickly, and I would think that they would be particularly picky about this when not growing.
How could we differentiate bifoliate from mono?My catt is having most of Pbulbs having only one leaf on them and two of the Pbulbs of the same plant with two leaves.In which catogery does mine belong to.?Is this usual?and how often should I water mine?
Reply With Quote
  #32 (permalink)  
Old 12-25-2008, 10:22 AM
FLBob's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: next to nothing Florida
Posts: 886
Thanks: 388
Thanked 1,024 Times in 419 Posts
FLBob is on a distinguished road
What I've read on coconut husk is that it has a fairly stable PH of around 6.5 +-.2. The husk lasts around 3 years in a pot. The only issue that I've read about is the salt content, which requires 3-4 soak/press cycles to remove. I know some very successful growers that use it in a mix with charcoal and sponge rock.

Frequently a hybrid will take on the characteristics of the parents, so many hybrids will produce both single and double leaves.

As far as water frequency I think that there are too many factors involved for a single answer. If it's hot then the plant will need more frequent watering, if the plant has a large root system it will pull the moisture from the surrounding area faster; more frequent watering. If planted in a course quick drying medium, the plant can need more frequent watering. If the plant is mounted with no medium then it can take more frequent watering.
With most hybrid catts I want a good drenching giving water until the vellum has become saturated and I water after the vellum is dry.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to FLBob For This Useful Post:
Rishad Kalarikkal (01-03-2009)
  #33 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2008, 10:03 PM
davetheorchidaddict's Avatar
Senior Member Photobucket
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
Posts: 679
Images: 7
Thanks: 75
Thanked 170 Times in 144 Posts
davetheorchidaddict is on a distinguished road
I work for a grower for supplies and they give a lot of information about growing orchids and they told me why they do not use coconut husk, did not say how acidic it is. Like FlBob said salt build up is a problem as well, make sure that the pot is flooded to wash out excess salt build up. I mount most of my Catts so the roots dry out after watering, I water them daily in summer - every 2 days in fall and spring - 3days in winter, judging from all the blooms that I have this time of the year they must like that schedule.

Each one of us has our own way of growing orchids and because we have success at it we continue doing it that way. We do refine it as we go with ideas we get talking to others or read on sites like this. That is what makes the addiction so interesting.
__________________
davetheorchidaddict
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to davetheorchidaddict For This Useful Post:
Rishad Kalarikkal (01-03-2009)
  #34 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2009, 11:17 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
ybrown is on a distinguished road
I "rescued" a catt from my grandmother. Rescued is not really a good word as I think it's doing only slightly better then in her house.
When I got it it had shivered pseudobulbs and almost all roots were dead and one shoot that didn't have a pseudobulb. I had it outdoor in the summer, but I think it didn't get nearly enough light. It grew a new shoot but this one still doesn't have a pseudobulb.
It's definitely is not getting enough light now and I am still trying to figure out the best way to put supplemental lighting for my plants. The temp in the house 68/62F day night.
Any ideas what needs to be done for the pseudobulb on the new shoot to develop, besides adding more light?
Yuliya
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ybrown For This Useful Post:
Rishad Kalarikkal (01-03-2009)
  #35 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2010, 01:36 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Newport News, VA (zone 8a)
Posts: 8
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Cantando is on a distinguished road
I have been growing two cattleyas for about two years now, and I have noticed something interesting about their growth. Every time a new psudobulb and leaf forms, the leaf never ends up being as wide or as thick as the leaves the plants originally had when I bought them. Both plants are vigorous healthy growers, but this one thing has me convinced I am still doing something wrong. Can anyone tell me what might be causing this?
Reply With Quote
  #36 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2010, 02:51 AM
berniep's Avatar
Member Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Taree NSW Australia
Posts: 2,351
Thanks: 4,582
Thanked 2,054 Times in 1,006 Posts
berniep is on a distinguished road
G'Day Cantando

Firstly welcome to the forum. Do your catts flower? and what colour green are the leaves? A pic would help us to answer but I think new growth will always look smaller until its fully mature.

Cheers
Bernie
__________________
I used to be retired now I'm just tired.
Reply With Quote
  #37 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2010, 03:17 AM
kmarch's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 12,937
Images: 1
Thanks: 4,192
Thanked 5,449 Times in 3,014 Posts
kmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond reputekmarch has a reputation beyond repute
Cantando, you're right to suspect a problem. The pseudobulbs and leaves should be increasngly larger until the plant reaches full blooming size. Are your catts flowering size? Perhaps they were in flower when you bought them? If you haven't already done so, compare your growing conditions (light, temperature, etc) to standard cattleya growing conditions as indicated above or on the AOS culture sheets (AOS | Members Only Area). Adjust your conditions as necessary to get them to more closely match those conditions indicated in the culture sheets. Let us know if you have wuestions.
Reply With Quote
  #38 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2010, 01:31 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Newport News, VA (zone 8a)
Posts: 8
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Cantando is on a distinguished road
I'm not sure how to upload pictures, actually, but I will if I can figure it out.

They both have never flowered. One has 7 pseudo bulbs and the other one has 5. Catts typically need to have at least 6 before being old enough to bloom, right? I don't have greenhouse conditions to give them, but I am good at knowing their watering needs and keep the humidity decent most of the time, and give them enough light that their color doesn't get dark green. In winter the house temps are around 62F most of the time. They appear very vigorous and are always growing. Could not getting enough humidity during the winter or not high enough temps cause it?
Reply With Quote
  #39 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2010, 06:54 AM
Brooke's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: 38 degrees north latitude
Posts: 7,016
Thanks: 8,640
Thanked 6,637 Times in 2,844 Posts
Brooke is on a distinguished road
It would help if you would tell us the location in which you grow the catt. Multiple growths without blooms is usually an indication of insufficient light to generate blooms.

Brooke
Reply With Quote
  #40 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2010, 07:06 AM
sunshine's Avatar
Super Moderator
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lagrange,Maine Zone 4a 4b
Posts: 4,877
Thanks: 892
Thanked 3,653 Times in 2,209 Posts
sunshine is on a distinguished road
I have to agree with BrookeThe catt in my sig line was a bare root when I bought it. Followed the instructions on the package and the plant got real big but wouldn't bloom. When I found the geeks I asked why my catt wasn't blooming? Not enough light. So I moved to another window where it got the morning sun until about noon time then just bright light the rest of the day. Believe it or not it budded and bloomed. This window gets 2000 cf of light or better in the morning. Pics would be nice and do keep us posted.

Here is a culture sheet for catts

AOS | Cattleya
__________________
Penny and Mosey
G:\DCIM\101SSCAM\SA400538.JPG

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000209739937
Reply With Quote
  #41 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2010, 06:12 AM
zaeem's Avatar
Executive Senior Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: karachi
Posts: 1,071
Images: 99
Thanks: 3,489
Thanked 552 Times in 354 Posts
zaeem is on a distinguished road
Smile catts in pots and basket

happy growth both in baskets and pots.
zaeem
Attached Thumbnails
catts.jpg   dscn1009.jpg   july-2009-orchids-from-thailand0001.jpg   dscn1012.jpg   dscn1851.jpg   dscn1881.jpg   dscn1161.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #42 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2010, 06:30 AM
sunshine's Avatar
Super Moderator
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lagrange,Maine Zone 4a 4b
Posts: 4,877
Thanks: 892
Thanked 3,653 Times in 2,209 Posts
sunshine is on a distinguished road
Those catts are gorgeous It definitely looks like their getting the right culture they need to make them grow.
__________________
Penny and Mosey
G:\DCIM\101SSCAM\SA400538.JPG

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000209739937
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to sunshine For This Useful Post:
zaeem (05-20-2010)
  #43 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2010, 10:20 PM
vcuchick's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 392
Images: 11
Thanks: 162
Thanked 198 Times in 86 Posts
vcuchick is on a distinguished road
Hello all! I just wanted to thank Fred and all of you for this really great thread- sticky! sticky!

I'm a novice grower who just got my first Cat in march. It's out of bloom but I already have a pseudobulb (is this term correct?) growing. I have gotten a great deal of good info from this thread.

thank you!

Here's my new Cat- Sc. Jungle Rose. I am finding it hard to track down minature cat culture info so any hints/tips/ideas are much appreciated. Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
sc-jungle-rose.gif   sc-jungle-rose-03302010.jpg  
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to vcuchick For This Useful Post:
zaeem (05-24-2010)
  #44 (permalink)  
Old 05-21-2010, 12:57 PM
exasperatus2002's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Allentown, PA 18103 zone 6b
Posts: 2,549
Thanks: 1,510
Thanked 603 Times in 354 Posts
exasperatus2002 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleksa View Post
I thought about putting them in baskets or mounting them but the space is problem... I have to keep them on my windowsill in winter and there, the space is limited... And I'm afraid of putting them in SH, they are very difficult to find here, so I'm trying not to experiment with them...

Patty, thanks for encouragement! This plant divided naturally, It grew in two opposite directions and created two separate plants!

Cattleya do very well in S/H. But it is best to make the switch while theres active root growth (green tips on the root) so it can adapt to the new environment quicker.
Reply With Quote
  #45 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2010, 02:40 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 39
Thanks: 12
Thanked 18 Times in 15 Posts
NewBloom is on a distinguished road
Question Wrinkled psuedobulbs

If the bulbs become wrinkled will they stay that way forever? My catt is recovering from a setback. I've now started setting the pot in a container of water that reaches below the rhizone in the hopes of getting those p'bulbs plump again. Is this a case where the appearance of the pulbs can't be changed? Here's a photo of them. They have deep grooves.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to NewBloom For This Useful Post:
zaeem (08-08-2010)
  #46 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2010, 08:51 AM
zaeem's Avatar
Executive Senior Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: karachi
Posts: 1,071
Images: 99
Thanks: 3,489
Thanked 552 Times in 354 Posts
zaeem is on a distinguished road
Dont make the media soggy,with water as you are doing,it will make no difference in my view.Please concentrate on catts.over all culturre as new shoots will grow.are your roots and leaves ok.give it partial sun with daily spraying.weekly root hormone and fertilizers.You should be fine.
zaeem
Reply With Quote
  #47 (permalink)  
Old 05-06-2011, 03:50 PM
NewGrower's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 197
Thanks: 51
Thanked 58 Times in 36 Posts
NewGrower is on a distinguished road
Is it normal for the bulbs to be slightly wrinkled? If not, what should I do?
Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #48 (permalink)  
Old 05-06-2011, 04:44 PM
sunshine's Avatar
Super Moderator
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lagrange,Maine Zone 4a 4b
Posts: 4,877
Thanks: 892
Thanked 3,653 Times in 2,209 Posts
sunshine is on a distinguished road
It is normal for catts to have wrinkles (they will look like ridges) in thier pbulbs.I can tell when my catts get dehydrated. The leaves will go from firm,soft and smooth to a wrinkled,soft and bendable.
__________________
Penny and Mosey
G:\DCIM\101SSCAM\SA400538.JPG

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000209739937
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sunshine For This Useful Post:
CherylT (07-12-2012), zaeem (05-07-2011)
  #49 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2011, 12:20 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: VietNam
Posts: 86
Thanks: 59
Thanked 175 Times in 51 Posts
culanluasg is on a distinguished road
Thanks fred
i give you a picture of cattleya,place i live
Blc Eagle Eyes
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to culanluasg For This Useful Post:
zaeem (10-10-2011)
  #50 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2011, 01:35 PM
RebelCowgirl's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tennessee Zone 7
Posts: 930
Thanks: 101
Thanked 352 Times in 293 Posts
RebelCowgirl is on a distinguished road
Beautiful Pic culanluasq!!!
__________________
~Jenny


Reply With Quote
  #51 (permalink)  
Old 10-06-2011, 03:03 PM
Member Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 1,471
Thanks: 0
Thanked 387 Times in 320 Posts
11Orchid126 is on a distinguished road
Usually, once a p-bulb has wrinkled, it will not smooth out. The new bulbs, however, should be smooth if watering is corrected.
Reply With Quote
  #52 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2011, 11:03 AM
zaeem's Avatar
Executive Senior Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: karachi
Posts: 1,071
Images: 99
Thanks: 3,489
Thanked 552 Times in 354 Posts
zaeem is on a distinguished road
great growing.Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #53 (permalink)  
Old 10-17-2011, 01:07 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Holland
Posts: 55
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
HotPot is on a distinguished road
As well as general advice on culture It might be good to list a few reliable ones for beginners to try.
Reply With Quote
  #54 (permalink)  
Old 02-02-2012, 08:15 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
wu78754 is on a distinguished road
What a cattleya!

I have never seen one with that many flowers, until now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by culanluasg View Post
Thanks fred
i give you a picture of cattleya,place i live
Blc Eagle Eyes
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to wu78754 For This Useful Post:
culanluasg (02-19-2012)
  #55 (permalink)  
Old 07-26-2012, 03:46 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Tucson, AZ / 9b
Posts: 25
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
desertcat is on a distinguished road
An Inorganic Mix for Cattleyas

Quote:
Originally Posted by FLBob View Post
What I've read on coconut husk is that it has a fairly stable PH of around 6.5 +-.2. The husk lasts around 3 years in a pot. The only issue that I've read about is the salt content, which requires 3-4 soak/press cycles to remove. I know some very successful growers that use it in a mix with charcoal and sponge rock.
.
Well my experience with anything grown in coconut has been VERY, VERY, BAD!! A small disclaimer here the last time was over 20 years ago in the late 80's very early 90's, that said I am still no fan of the stuff even if the QC and other problems have been eliminated or improved.

Last year however I received an orchid planted in a material i was sure was a mistake: Volcanic Rock or Lava Rock. The more I became use to it the more I liked it especially here in AZ. It is almost impossible to over water, and second, unlike organic medium, it never brakes down. That said I wish it had a tad bit more water retention. Based on my experience with the Volcanic Rock (it is a dark grey color not red) I think my next medium I may experiment with is a modification of an inorganic mix that is normally used for Dendrobiums: The modified Inorganic Cattleya Mix consists of: Medium Stalite; Large Sponge Rock; Medium Lava Rock, and Medium Granite Chips. I am debating in regards to make it semi-organic by adding in some Medium Tree Fern Fiber. Tree Fern Fiber or Not it should be an excellent draining medium, yet the lava rock, sponge rock, and stalite should provide enough nooks and crannies to store some water that the roots can seek out what the medium itself does not remain saturated for long leading to root rot. Probably the only down side to using an inorganic mix -- especially in AZ -- is you are likely to have to water the orchid far more often, especially in the summer, something you you might not have to work about when using an organic mix that is likely to hold a lot more moisture.
Reply With Quote
  #56 (permalink)  
Old 07-26-2012, 04:06 AM
Bolero's Avatar
V.I.P Member Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Geelong, Australia
Posts: 4,474
Thanks: 3,519
Thanked 3,423 Times in 1,249 Posts
Bolero is on a distinguished road
I agree, I wouldn't grow catts in coconut husks ever. I have had huge problems and maybe it depends on climate.

My best luck is in perlite and vermiculite. Lava rock would also work as stated above. I found that cattleyas eventually become stunted and unhappy is coconut. The only plants I would use for coconut are Dendrobiums and Cymbidiums which can handle the moisture and salt levels.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Bolero For This Useful Post:
zaeem (08-02-2012)
  #57 (permalink)  
Old 09-07-2012, 07:55 PM
leeflea's Avatar
Member Photobucket
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: North East Mississippi, USA
Posts: 234
Images: 31
Thanks: 129
Thanked 31 Times in 30 Posts
leeflea is on a distinguished road
Oddly, I find catts the easiest to grow as they are not tedious. And they are the ultimate joy. Lee
__________________
"I have always depended on the kindness of strangers"
Reply With Quote
  #58 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2013, 07:54 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Felts Mills New York
Posts: 7
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
jyoung03 is on a distinguished road
So far, still alive

I have apparently successfully re-potted my first orchid (Cattelya). It appears to be doing well, I have noticed new leaf growth over the last 2 months, and all leaves seem to have what I would call a healthy green color. My problem is the fertilizing, I have read a number of different ways to apply it, but am trying to nail down the most effective. Some suggestions have been to soak up through the plastic dish that the plastic pot is sitting in. Some have suggested spraying on leaves and roots during watering. Some have suggested pouring it directly to the soil and roots. I do understand what it means to dilute, (one thread recommended 30-10-10 at 1/4 dilution), but it is hard to determine about the volume I should be using, which I am realize is somewhat dependent upon the method of application. I will go with any method that seems within my capabilities, ( I can kill any plant without much trouble) that y'all suggest because it has been well over a month since my last attempt, and then I think I over did it because I had black tips appear on a couple of the leaves, ( I did immediately flush it as I read to do on this website, seems no further damage has taken place). So...any help will be appreciated, this is my third attempt at trying to get an Orchid through one complete growing cycle, without any luck. My wife thinks it would have a better chance of surviving if I just threw it outside in the snow. Thanks, Jon
Catt Mandu likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #59 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2013, 12:57 AM
Catt Mandu's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Georgia (USA)
Posts: 2,110
Thanks: 403
Thanked 818 Times in 596 Posts
Catt Mandu is on a distinguished road
Hi Jon

There are many specialty orchid fertilizers sold out there, with different proportions of N, P, and K. What most orchid fertilizers have in common is the addition of trace elements (Mg, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, and Zn are the most common additions). Plants also need Ca and S, and you will get some of that from most water supplies (sometimes enough, sometimes not).

Let's start with your basic goal of getting your first plant(s) through their first of growth in good shape. I suggest fertilizing "weakly, weekly".

What does that mean? Let's start with any water-soluble orchid fertilizer you can find at your local big-box home improvement store or garden center. Instructions on my fertilizer package say to mix according to the ratio of 1 teaspoon per gallon of water. To fertilize "weakly", I cut that concentration to 1/4 tsp per gallon of water, I water once per week with that. When plants are actively growing (leaves or new leads actively growing), such as you may see in the spring if plants are outside, the proportion could increase to 1/2 tsp per gallon. You can water with plain water between fertilizer applications.

To apply fertilizer or water, you can just take the plant to the sink and pour the solution through your growing medium (I assume when you say "soil", you don't mean potting soil, but instead a medium that is coarse-textured, free-draining and meant for orchids, such as bark-based orchid potting mix). I have a modest number of plants, and I water these plants, sitting on plastic trays, with a small pump sprayer (sprayer used only for water+fertilizer and plain water; no other chemicals).

There should be no need to immediately flush the fertilizer solution through with water, assuming your water quality is reasonably good and has not gone through a salt-based water softener. If you are uncertain, you can either collect rain water for watering your plants, or water with bottled water (gallons) from the grocery store.

I hope some of this helps!
jyoung03 likes this.
__________________
Je suis Charlie
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Catt Mandu For This Useful Post:
jyoung03 (01-03-2013)
  #60 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2013, 10:33 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Felts Mills New York
Posts: 7
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
jyoung03 is on a distinguished road
Thanks very much for your helpful post, I feel a lot better about fertilizing this plant without overdoing it.
Catt Mandu likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #61 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2013, 11:21 AM
Catt Mandu's Avatar
V.I.P Member
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Georgia (USA)
Posts: 2,110
Thanks: 403
Thanked 818 Times in 596 Posts
Catt Mandu is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by jyoung03 View Post
Thanks very much for your helpful post, I feel a lot better about fertilizing this plant without overdoing it.
You're welcome Jon

I will add that step 2 of providing nutrients may be to supplement with some calcium and magnesium, especially while plants are actively growing (new roots, stems & leaves). There are commercial supplements out there (CalMag or similar products). Those are certainly fine.

What I do is dissolve a little gypsum (CaSO4) and Epsom salts (MgSO4), 1/2 to 1 teaspoon each in a gallon of water, then water with that at least once a month, between fertilizer applications. Gypsum and epsom salts are widely available and relatively cheap, they also provide another nutrient, sulfur. Gypsum can take a while to dissolve, I suggest making a gallon of it and just keeping it on hand for when you need it.
__________________
Je suis Charlie
Reply With Quote
  #62 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2013, 04:18 PM
Member Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 1,471
Thanks: 0
Thanked 387 Times in 320 Posts
11Orchid126 is on a distinguished road
Good advice from Catt M. I don't use the gypsom because our water has enough calcium in it. I just use the Epsom salts, same dose. And I leave the plants in place over a tray of stones and just pour it through.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New cattleya... kenc82 Newbie Questions 9 11-27-2008 04:17 PM
why is my plant dieing!?!?! Oshi5Rock Newbie Questions 16 08-02-2007 08:07 AM
Cattleya Basic Help Needed Sharyn Newbie Questions 8 02-09-2007 12:58 PM
Does my Cattleya require cooler winter temps? desertgal Orchid Care Cultivation 6 11-08-2006 09:36 PM
Need advice on Cattleya uyenanh Newbie Questions 4 03-18-2006 08:18 PM






Free Vote Caster from Bravenet.com Free Vote Caster from Bravenet.com


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0
Orchid Forum

vBskin developed by: CreationLab